Design Engine
Training Classes/Tutorials for Designers, Engineers, & 3D Professionals


Google+

Ideas, Thoughts, Perspectives

June 14th, 2016

Designs for the World’s First 3D-printed Freeform House

Architecture studio Wimberly, Allison, Tong & Goo (WATG) won first place in Branch Technology’s Freeform Home Design Challenge, which brought together architects, designers, artists and engineers worldwide to explore how 3D printing technologies can improve our built environment and lives today.

Specifically, WATG’s Chicago-based team, consisting of Daniel Caven, Chris Hurst, Miguel Alvarez and Brent Watanabe won the freeform design competition with their unique idea named Curve Appeal. The main concept behind a “freeform” house is just what the name implies, a building that is not made in the regular shape or form of a house. Branch Technology founder Platt Boyd explained, “Curve Appeal is a very thoughtful approach to the design of our first house. It responds well to the site conditions, magnifies the possibilities of cellular fabrication and pushes the envelope of what is possible while still utilizing more economical methods for conventional building systems integration.” As part of the competition, there were several requirements that needed to be implemented into the design of the house. The interior needed to include a kitchen, bath, living area and at least one bedroom and the entire building needed to resolve mechanical, electrical, plumbing and lighting requirements all while still allowing for passive solar design strategies. The challenge was to rethink traditional construction and building systems and create a functional 600-800 square-foot single-family home.

To construct the building, 28 panels will be 3D-printed at an off-site location, before being joined together to create two exterior walls, a roof and the interior core. The home features a design with plenty of light-filled living space, allowing occupants to be more connected with the nature outside, as well as passive strategies for keeping the building temperate.

Planning phases for Curve Appeal will take place in Chattanooga, Tennessee at Branch Technology’s lab and 3D printing is expected to begin in 2017.

5759ac7c2200002d00f801d6

A “freeform” house is just what the name implies, a building that is not made in the regular shape or form of a house.

5759ac4715000030001b8966

1465556318-1e8219b70876eae9ee2a60141dd5ff44-600x307

1465556134-7ed432915fde5e0f94442298cfdcae42-600x307
5759aca22200002e00f801d8

Images via: WATG, Branch Technology

 

Article Written by Mila Medonaite for Design Engine, June 14, 2016


About the Author

Design-Engine





Design Engine Industrial Design Training Pro Engineer
 
 

 

High-Tech Compost, Zera, Turns Food Waste Into Fertilizer in 24 hours

While most traditional food composts are made to be kept outside, the Zera designed by Whirlpool’s WLabs, is an attractive indoor food recycler. As part of an Indiegogo campaign, the company claims the Zera can convert a week...
by Design-Engine
0

 
 

Toyota Thinks We Should Be Emotionally Connected to Our Future Cars

Toyota believes vehicles of the future should be built with the philosophy of “kinetic warmth,” the belief that mobile technology should foster an emotional connection with the user and should be warm, welcoming and most im...
by Design-Engine
0

 
 

Everlast, The Scannable Pen and Paper Notebook You Can Reuse Endlessly

The Everlast Notebook is reusable over and over again. While there are plenty of smart notebooks and pens already on the market, the Everlast notebook feels just like a traditional notebook and provides a classic pen and paper ...
by Design-Engine
0

 

 

Vinci, The First AI-Enabled Headphones That Don’t Require a Smartphone

Vinci smart headphones play music all on their own – no phone required. The voice-controlled, wireless headphones can also act as an activity tracker, get directions and even read back text messages. Vinci headphones are powe...
by Design-Engine
0

 
 

The Proposed Human-Powered Floating Gym for Paris

Italian firm Carlo Ratti Associati unveiled designs for the Paris Navigating Gym, a human-powered 66-foot long fitness vessel that can accommodate about 45 individuals. The fitness vessel features Technogym-built ARTIS machines...
by Design-Engine
0

 



0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


You must be logged in to post a comment.